Monday’s Morning Glory – Jamie McCanney

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Monday’s Morning Glory – Jamie McCanney

Monday’s Morning Glory is enduro21’s salute to a rider that delivered the goods over the weekend. This morning Jamie McCanney is our guy… If you’re good enought race wins will

Monday’s Morning Glory – Jamie McCanney

Monday’s Morning Glory is enduro21’s salute to a rider that delivered the goods over the weekend. This morning Jamie McCanney is our guy…

If you’re good enought race wins will come and go but you’ll always remember the day you won your first world championship. Or so we’ve been told. Two days before his 19th birthday Jamie McCanney secured his first world championship in style with a double race win at the Enduro World Championship GP of Romania.

Blitzing his way to a commanding win, like he has done so many times this year, McCanney wrapped up the Enduro Youth Cup title.

To say that the Manxman has dominated his class this year is somewhat understated. Recording eight consecutive race wins from Argentina until Romania with Spain and Portugal in between, McCanney more often than not placed over one-minute clear of his rivals. His only defeat came at the season opener in Chile where he claimed a 2-2 scorecard behind local rider Benjamin Herrera.

But considering that McCanney entered the 2013 underprepared makes those results a victory in themselves. Forced to spend the winter recuperating from surgery to repair a dislocated shoulder, the young Manxman only managed to ride a bike for five hours prior to the start of day one in Chile.

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Racing his way back to fitness, McCanney hit his stride at the GP of Argentina and never looked back. Amassing race win after race win he finally rode into the records books by becoming the first enduro world champion to be crowned in 2013.

“It’s an incredible feeling to actually win a world championship,” told McCanney moments after being doused in champagne. “I knew it was possible to win the title if I finished fourth or better on day two in Romania.

“All day I tried not to think about championship and instead focused on each special test. But once I exited the last enduro test I knew I’d done enough. Riding into the team awning at the end of the day as a world champion was amazing. Everyone was cheering for me – I’d just won a world championship.”

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